Virally Suppressed

This is the goal for MenStar: men who are engaged in treatment and virally suppressed. Success here means men will not transmit the virus within their communities.


What many of these men may pass on, however, is that the healthcare experience has improved for men and that a healthy life is possible with HIV.

Innovations at this stage of the cascade focus on ways to help men manage a lifelong commitment to staying on treatment. This may include ways for men to collect their medications close to home and outside of the clinic—and less often.

A close, convenient, clinic-free pickup point for HIV medications.

Virally Suppressed
Dablap is well-known local slang for a shortcut. Dablapmeds makes it easy for stable HIV clients to dramatically cut the time it takes to get their medications. Read More
Virally Suppressed
To get clients into care, you need to get care to clients. Even if that means crossing rivers and dodging rhinos. Outsourcing medicine distribution to the private sector eliminates the need for clients and health workers to take lengthy journeys to collect health products. Read More
Virally Suppressed
Description/Activities:  Ethiopia took a systematic and deliberate approach to six-month MMS. With support from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), ICAP worked with the Federal Ministry of Health (FMOH) and six Regional Health Bureaus to conduct a successful pilot of the model at six hospitals in 2017.  What Makes the Intervention Unique/Different: While …
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This initiative takes a comprehensive approach to providing clinical services in the community across the cascade - from testing to treatment.
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Multi-Month Dispensing of Drugs (MMD) Decentralized Drug Distribution Adoption and Implementation of Differentiated Service Delivery Models Policy to do Annual Viral Load Testing
Virally Suppressed
To address the gaps and challenges in the monitoring and management of patients with high VL, and function as a form of differentiated care for unstable clients with high VL.
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Faced with challenges to patient adherence and retention on antiretroviral therapy (ART), Mozambique implemented a community approach to service delivery. This approach provides patients with easier access to their antiretroviral, in addition to peer support.
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CIDRZ provides multi-month drug dispensing (3 months’ supply of ART) for each of the patients participating in the CAGs. Each CAG has 6 patients, who take turns visiting the ART clinic for clinical consultation and antiretroviral (ARV) drug collection. Annually, each patient has two clinical visits and will return to the clinic for their clinical follow-up appointment, even if it is not their turn to collect medications. Each CAG is assigned a community health worker (CHW) who provides basic psycho-social and clinical support to the CAG members. Index testing through family and partner notification has also been implemented through the CAGs.
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The ART-AC model provides patient-friendly access to ART for clinically stable patients, ART distribution, and care and support to groups of stable patients. ACs meet either at a health care facility, or at a community-based venue for symptom screening, group discussions, ART distribution, and care and support to groups of stable patients (Tsondai et al., 2017).
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Self-formed groups of clients on ARTs; participants meet in the community and share information about their health and ART adherence; then take turns going to the facility. Every 3 months one member attends clinic where they receive a clinical check-up and lab testing; they also review the health information of the group (CARG) and then picks up ARV refills for the entire group.